SOME KID:

A MONOLOGUE

(NOT REALLY, IT'S MORE LIKE A PLAY TITLED "ELECTION DAY" STARRING TOY FIGURES AS AMERICAN CITIZENS)

Written for Protest Play Project's Get Out the Vote - a call for non-partisan plays encouraging people to vote in the Election.

1 gender neutral, any race, any size.

COMEDY - DRAMA - 3 Mins

PRODUCTION HISTORY

None.

Oh my gosh. This play is so much fun with a terrific purpose. I love any opportunity to dive into the weird world of Asher Wyndham — I consistently laugh, gasp, cry, or some variation of all three when I read his work! — and SOME KID is no exception. I love presenting the importance of voting to kids in a language they understand. This will be a perfect addition to the Protest Play Project’s voting plays.
— Jordan Elizabeth Henry
I love self-awareness and plays/playwrights that poke fun at themselves and structure while still delivering a concise message. This is almost a play-within-a play: you watch as a young child drops some serious knowledge about the age-old excuses for not wanting to vote, but you are also watching the playwright putting on the play through photos of toys. I think this would be great, not only for an actor, but for a director to dive into as well.
— Rachel Bykowski
This is the most adorable thing that I have ever read in my entire life—but more than that, it is incredibly important and accessible. As usual, Wyndham’s writing is charming, energetic, and teaming with positivity AND IT HAS PICTURES.
— Emily Hageman
Faith in humanity restored by this wonderful play. Thanks to some hardworking Playmobil figures, I feel better than ever about my voting rights and why they matter. A lovely and engaging work that has the potential to go viral by the midterm elections.
— Rachael Carnes
Quirky and fun[.]
— Kara Emily Krantz
Like Wyndham’s other monologues driven and delivered by a child, all lessons and irony befall on adults. It’s clever and surprising and, in this play, charming. The piece’s triumph is, despite the weight which comes with voting, it reminds us how simple a task it can be.
— Ricardo Soltero-Brown