WHAT SOME GIRLS DO FOR MALL GIFT CERTIFICATES

A Five-Minute Play

Two homeless girls in a changing room in a mall.

2F/Any race, any size

SHORT -  DRAMA - 5 Mins

This play is published, but rights are with the writer. 

Published in 105 Five-Minute Plays for Study and Performance from Smith & Kraus

And also in 5-Minute Plays, edited by Lawrence Harbison, from Applause.

PRODUCTION HISTORY

None.

DEVELOPMENT HISTORY

Staged reading, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 2010.

As in many of his other plays, Wyndham sheds light on the underground lives of the marginalized. I want to gather Larissa and Julie into my arms and fix their broken, desperate situation. By giving us this story, Asher has given us the gift of discomfort — it is a call to action; you cannot read or see this piece of theatre without wanting to lend a helping hand to those who are struggling to survive.
— Jordan Elizabeth Henry
A heartbreaking short play. It’s hard to read because it’s sadly realistic. Definitely makes you want to open your wallet and hug a stranger.
— Sharai Bohannon
Two sisters are on a slippery slope and their falling and failing. It’s heartbreaking because in a short period of time you have come to care about them and see how much they care about each other. The play does a beautiful job of giving circumstances through show and not tell.
— Claudia Haas
A snippet from the lives of two desperate sisters, this powerful portrait grabs you from the beginning, and instills in the audience a feeling of dread that is sadly all too true. A well-written, short tragedy.
— Robert Lynn
Truly painful situation. Hard to read, but truthful in its intent. Part of the impact is its brevity; in so short a time we see so much and we hope for the best. Very well-written.
— George Sapio
Fantastic script! I did not see it going in the direction that it went. What a heart-breaker. Very clear characters in just a short time frame. I understand who both characters are, why they’re there, and probably where they’re going. Absolutely tragic but wonderfully written. I highly recommend this short piece!
— Daniel Guyton